Cutting Room for March 30

  • Although I don’t need an excuse to be overly communicative, the University of Nebraska at Omaha is giving me one the last week of April. The school will recognize it as “Communication Week,” and one of the cool happenings during this celebration of all things communicatively connected will take place at the Aksarben Cinema. On Tuesday, April 26 at 5:30 p.m., the theater will screen DuSable to Obama: Chicago’s Black Metropolis, a documentary written by the dean of UNO’s School of Communication, Gail F. Baker. Those who wish to check out this powerful history of Chicago’s African-American community should drop an email to .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address). There. I’ve done my best to communicate the communicative communications of Communication Week.

  • Likely drawn in by the repeating initials, Amy Adams will be Lois Lane in Zack Snyder’s Superman reboot. The lovely thespian will be able to show off a wide range of emotions, including “frightened,” “helpless” and “moderately sassy.” It’s the type of role actresses are drawn to for so many reasons … reasons that can be stacked neatly and handed to a bank teller.

  • In what the uninspired will surely call “Ballet-Gate,” a scandal has erupted over the dancing in Black Swan. A body double named Sarah Lane is claiming that she was actually the body in 95 percent of the full-body dance scenes in Black Swan, making Natalie Portman’s Oscar-winning performance significantly less impressive. The film’s choreographer, Benjamin Millepied, says Natalie did 85 percent of the dancing ... although, it may be hard to trust him because he 100 percent totally knocked-up Natalie Portman. Is this an unknown body double’s attempt to get media attention or have we been hoodwinked? Luckily, nobody really cares.

Cutting Room provides breaking local and national movie news … complete with added sarcasm. Send any relevant information to .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address). Check out Ryan on the radio on CD 105.9 (Fridays at around 7:30 a.m.), on his blog at thereader.com/film/C19 and on Twitter (twitter.com/thereaderfilm).


entered on 03/30/11 at 09:39 PM | read comments »


Cutting Room for March 23

  • I think I accidentally mentally combined the two events that Film Streams at the Ruth Sokolof Theater (filmstreams.org) have planned for April 1 to June 16. They’re doing another installment of two film series: “Forever Young Family and Children’s Series” and “Great Directors.” But I’m pretty sure that kids won’t be rushing to see 8 1/2 and that Pete’s Dragon wasn’t a Fellini movie (although I wish it was). For accurate lists of when each series will be showing what, I recommend checking the site and not asking me, as I’m likely to suggest you take the family to go see Satyricon.

  • Attack the Block, a flick in which urban British youth fight aliens, is getting rave reviews and sparking an interesting discussion: Do the thick accents the kids sport warrant subtitles for the wide release? A legion of moviegoers are prone to grab a pitchfork and torch at the thought of reading during movies. However, the potential of hearing “what did he say?” a thousand times and the fact that I have no allergic reaction to seeing words on a screen leaves me hoping they slap some text on this bad boy. Regardless, it’s an interesting discussion, no?

  • Magic Kingdom has been described as Night at the Museum in Disneyland, or as I summarize it, “Oh God … please … no!” But the first draft was written by Ron Moore, who made millions love the reboot of Battlestar Galactica. Now comes word that the rewrite duties will be handled by Pulitzer Prize winner Michael Chabon. This is like that one time that a Nobel Prize-winning physicist made me a sandwich at Subway.

Cutting Room provides breaking local and national movie news … complete with added sarcasm. Send any relevant information to .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address). Check out Ryan on the radio on CD 105.9 (Fridays at around 7:30 a.m.), on his blog at thereader.com/film/C19 and on Twitter (twitter.com/thereaderfilm).


entered on 03/23/11 at 10:09 PM | read comments »


Cutting Room for March 9

  • Close friends of mine are afraid of birds. Those folks should prepare to be terrified, as Film Streams at the Ruth Sokolof Theater is taking your feathered nemeses one terrifying step further. Ghost Bird, a documentary about the discovery of the long-extinct ivory-billed woodpecker, should be intimidating to avian-phobes on title alone. On March 15, a collaboration with the Nebraska Chapter of the Nature Conservancy will result in a discussion following a screening of the film. For tickets, check out filmstreams.org, but let me save some of you time at the Q&A: No, they are not all “out to get you.” You just smell like bread.

  • When Alcon Entertainment, a Warner Brothers-based production company, snapped up rights to make prequels or sequels to Blade Runner, fans collectively had a tiny mouth regurgitation. Thankfully, they’re at least saying the right things, as Alcon producer Andrew Kosove said they would love to have Christopher Nolan direct an installment. While this is the equivalent of sitting on a mall-Santa’s lap and asking for a bicycle, at least their heart is in the right place.

  • JJ Abrams just cast Jesus. Well, that is to say Abrams and buddy Jonah Nolan (Chris’s brother… and original creator for the concept of Memento) have cast Jim Caviezel (the Christ from The Passion of the Christ) as the lead in “Person of Interest,” their new TV pilot. Also starring Michael Emerson (“Lost”), I am officially a person interested in this show.

Cutting Room provides breaking local and national movie news … complete with added sarcasm. Send any relevant information to .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address). Check out Ryan on the radio on CD 105.9 (Fridays at around 7:30 a.m.), on his blog at thereader.com/film/C19 and on Twitter (twitter.com/thereaderfilm).


entered on 03/11/11 at 10:58 PM | read comments »


Page 106 of 133 pages ‹ First  < 104 105 106 107 108 >  Last ›

The Giver

This adaptation of Lois Lowry's beloved award-winning classic will be none of those things.

GRADE
D


Boyhood

The only coming-of-age story anyone ever needs to make. 

GRADE
A+


Guardians of the Galaxy

A gleeful space opera that is as visually stunning as it is hilarious.

GRADE
A


Lucy

A girl ingests a drug that makes her God. For real.

GRADE
C+


Dawn of the Planet of the Apes

Those damned apes are back and anything but dirty.

GRADE
B+


We Are the Best

Set in Stockholm in 1982, this is punk rock female adolescence at its finest.

GRADE
A


Snowpiercer

Awesome, literal class warfare on a train that holds the only humans that survived the new ice age.

GRADE
A-


Obvious Child

Billed as a comedy, this is actually a sophisticated, empathetic look at a crucial issue.

GRADE
B+


Grade A-Holes

The proliferation of comic book movies has reached its cultural apex, so thoroughly dominating the box office and public...

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Lucy Goosey

It doesn’t work this way with people, but there’s a level of confident stupidity a movie can display that makes it...

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Fuzzy Focus

Time has whittled mainstream memory of the original late 1960s/early 1970s Planet of the Apes franchise down to an image of...

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“We’re Not a Girl Band”

Punk was always as much about the mentality as the sound, as much about rebellion for rebellion’s sake as it was...

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