Omahans put their own spin on Stephen King’s The Shining

Jason Levering leads stage adaptation of horror classic to benefit Benson Theatre Project

Credit Omaha writer-director Jason Levering for possessing the temerity to not only consider adapting Stephen King's meta horror novel The Shining to the stage but to follow through and actually get the master's approval. Now he's only hours away from seeing the adaptation he and Aaron Sailors wrote make its world premiere.

The Shining, A Play, has a three-show run March 21 and 22 at Sokol Auditorium, 2234 South 13th St., the old-line South Omaha space known for live music concerts, not full-blown dramatic theatricals. Make no mistake, this will be a big, effects-laden production commensurate with the sprawling, supernatural-laced source material.

The show's a fundraiser for the Benson Theatre Project. Levering is artistic director of the nonprofit, which needs $250,000 to purchase the former Benson vaudeville and movie house at 6054 Maple St. before renovation work can begin. It's adjacent to the Pizza Shoppe and PS Collective, whose owner, Amy Ryan, is the project's executive director. Ryan, a community advocate and arts supporter, goes way back with Levering, who's also co-founder of the Omaha Film Festival.

An Aurora, Neb., native, Levering's worked on short films. He and Sailors are collaborating on a feature film adaptation of short stories from author Dan Chaon's Stay Awake collection. That project's on hold while Chaon works on the Starz series Most Wanted. Levering's s stage credits include acting in the Blue Barn Theatre's Round Midnight series and adapting Oscar Wilde fairy tales at The Rose theater.

What made him think of reworking what many consider a horror masterpiece? It starts with him being "a huge Stephen King fan." Then there's the fact the claustrophobic story largely unfolds in one location, the Overlook Hotel, which lends itself well to stage presentation. Finally, there's The Shining franchise of the popular novel as well as successful film and television treatments, not to mention the built-in brand that the title and King's own name bring to any adaptation.

"The genesis started during the 2013 Omaha Gives campaign that raised some money for the theater," Levering says. "Afterwards we talked about doing our own production as a fundraiser and how while we don't have our own theater troupe we know enough people that we could try and put something together.

"We didn't want it to be something that had already been done here. We wanted it to be something special, that is our own. But we also wanted it to be something recognizable. I suggested doing a stage adaptation of a popular book that hasn't been adapted yet. I naturally fixed on The Shining. We all thought it was a great idea."

That left the not so small matter of getting the famous author to bestow his blessing on the endeavor.

"You have to get permission from Mr. King for something like that," says Levering, who made the overture to the agency, Paradigm, that represents the legend.

The go-ahead came easier and quicker than Levering imagined.

"Mr. King read our proposal and he was very interested in what we were doing with the Benson Theatre project and he gave us a limited option to adapt The Shining to stage."

King also retained the right of approval over the script, the director (Levering) and the cast.

Levering next dived deep into the book and into the lore surrounding its inception and he discovered a reason why his instinct to adapt it as a play may have resonated with King.

"In my research I found out Mr. King originally conceived it as a five-act play and then he eventually turned it into a novel."

Levering's careful study of the book reintroduced him to the story's great set-up. Jack and Wendy Torrance and their boy Danny become stranded in a haunted mountain hotel in a winter storm. Danny's extrasensory gift makes him the target of evil spirits who prey on him through his weak father, intent on forever imprisoning the family there.

"It kind of has everything. The other thing it has going for it is these fantastic characters, Jack especially. He's written as a good man, a recovered alcoholic with some anger issues but doing his damnedest to pull his family back together. To go from that point where there's all this hope when they first move into the Overlook to the end where he's literally trying to kill his family it's such an incredible journey."

Distilling the heart of the story took Levering and Sailors some time.

"We went through the book together. Aaron broke it down into an outline so we could figure out the main beats of each scene – what we really needed to capture that was essential. We worked from that outline as we were writing the script. He took Act III, I took Act I, and we started working forward."

They finished the remaining acts together.

"As we wrote we sent pages back and forth, editing and polishing  each other's work. We sent pages to another writer friend, Krissy Hamm, an associate producer on the show, and she gave us notes. It really helped to have that third person looking at it."

Levering says he and Sailors abided by one operating principle.

"We both wanted to be very faithful to the book. A lot of the dialogue is pulled straight from the book. There's only a few points where the dialogue was changed or something was added so that the scene would play well on stage. For the most part though the dialogue is pretty much Mr. King's words."

Other things are being done to make certain story elements live on stage. For example, newspaper accounts Jack reads silently to himself in the novel are projected on a screen. Flashbacks play out on the side while the main action occurs stage center. Creative ways were found to bring the Overlook's topiary animals to life. Levering is intent on making the physical experience as visceral as possible for the audience and thus, William Castle-style, action and sound will happen throughout the auditorium, including the balcony.

Lighting and sound effects will cast a dark, malevolent mood.

Levering consulted Omaha theater veteran Kevin Lawler and brought in veteran scenic designer Kit Gough to help realize the horror.

"I want it to be immersive. I want to give the audience the feeling they really may not go home. I want them to feel they're sitting in the middle of the Overlook Hotel as it comes to life. From the time you walk in the door it'll be like you've entered the Overlook."

Levering had his own scary encounter with the work.

"My hardest challenge was the moment the hotel takes over Jack. I was excited to write it but I was also terrified of it because that scene is where his character shifts and becomes the monster. He's in the Colorado Room and basically the hotel has come to life. Lloyd the bartender manifests and pours him a martini. That scene was difficult for me to write because it's at that point he turns on his family and I honest to God had nightmares of wanting to hurt my wife and kids, even though I never would.

"The idea someone could turn like that is frightening. It was actually the last scene I wrote. It was the worst for me. I'm also an actor and so method-style I poured myself a martini and drank it while writing. I wanted to feel what he was going through."

Levering feels "honored" and "thankful" King approved "the direction we're taking." The cast is headed by Marc Erickson as Jack, Levering's son Christopher as Danny and Christina Rohling as Wendy.

An invitation's been extended King, so don't be surprised if you spot the king of horror among the throng.

Performances are 7 p.m. Friday and 2 and 7 p.m. on Saturday.

For tickets, visit theshiningomaha.com. For more about the restoration project, visit bensontheatre.org.

Read more of Leo Adam Biga's work at leoadambiga.wordpress.com.

posted at 02:27 pm
on Friday, March 14th, 2014

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