Cutting Room for January 2019


  • I can’t remember a piece I’ve had that set off as much fairly well-intended discussion as my argument that Die Hard is not actually a Christmas movie. It only seems right to follow in that franchise’s footsteps and exploit that popularity as much as possible! So here’s news that McClane, the Die Hard prequel that will try to shoehorn a backstory onto a cop whose whole schtick was that he was just an average guy, will likely be rated R. That’s not much news, but it also doesn’t sound like much of a movie. Nobody needs this. Actually, I just looked at Bruce Willis’s IMDB page. Bruce Willis needs this.
  • The live-action Star Wars series, The Mandalorian, has me breathin’ like a morbidly obese Darth Vader on a stair stepper. Pedro Pascal from Game of Thrones is the lead, which is cool. Nick Nolte will be gruff about something in space, which is also cool. But y’all, Carl Weathers and Werner Herzog are in this thing! That’s Apollo Creed and the director-turned-actor who once got shot during a press interview and kept going, saying it was “an insignificant bullet.” The idea of a space western set in the outer reaches of Star Wars is cool enough, but Herzog’s nihilistic intonations will fix any dialogue problems this universe has had. Just imagine a wry German monotone crawling over “I don’t like sand. It’s all coarse, and rough, and irritating. And it gets everywhere.” Poetry.
  • The last thing that Jodie Foster directed was a subpar episode of last season’s Black Mirror. The last two films she directed starred Mel “Stop Giving Me Chances, I’m Just an Awful Person at My Core” Gibson. And yet, I’m still inexplicably overjoyed at news she’ll be starring in and helming the English-language remake of the Icelandic eco-thriller Women at War. It’s about a vigilante environmentalist, so it’s as close as we’ll likely come to seeing Foster as a superhero. Gibson is not set to appear, unless he’s planning on the role he’s been destined to play for years: Pollution.
  • Netflix, whose spending habits seem irresponsible until you realize they have like all of our money, is pairing with Spike Lee’s production company on See You Yesterday. The film combines one of the best things, time travel, with one of the worst things, police brutality. Based on an award-winning short film by Stefon Bristol and Fredrica Bailey, this thoughtful blend of social activism and whimsical imagination sounds downright brilliant. That’s provided they keep other time travelers away. Nobody wants to see Marty McFly explain “Black Lives Matter.”

Cutting Room provides breaking local and national movie news … complete with added sarcasm. Send any relevant information to film@thereader.com. Check out Ryan on CD 105.9 on Fridays at around 7:40 a.m. and on KVNO 90.7 on Wednesdays and follow him on Twitter.


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