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Read past Reed Moore daily newsletters

HERE’S YOUR RUNDOWN

Happy All American Pet Photo Day
Reed Moore is a pushover for anything with fur or feathers.

Today’s news:

  • A group of researchers at UNMC will examine North and South Omaha’s lack of green space and its effect on extreme heat.
  • By the end of the Nebraska Republican Party Convention, the party loses much of its leadership, including its chairman.
  • Railroad union workers are protesting BNSF in hopes of getting the railroad giant to negotiate a contract.

REED MOORE’S FEATURED STORY

‘The Fund Just Keeps Getting Bigger’: Nebraskans Denied Help as State Stockpiles $108M in Federal Funds

Morghan Price poses with her son, Ezra, 13, and her daughter, Jada, 5, at their North Omaha home on June 8, 2022. Price recalls the emotional toll of living in poverty: “It’s like, OK, I have to stay here all my life and look at … depression, anxiety [and] stress, on top of raising my kids in it and teaching them to look at that, too,” she said. “And that’s all that you can see.” Photo by Chris Bowling.

The state says it has a spending plan for extra Temporary Assistance for Needy Families funds. But legislators and advocates say Nebraska is being tight-lipped about the details.

By Leah Cates. Published in The Reader.

REED MOORE >>


The Reed Moore newsletter is supported by:


COVID-19 UPDATE

‘Rona roundup:

Vaccine mandates were a last resort for getting people immunized. Did it work? And if it did, was it worth the cost of potentially breaching public trust? A new study aims to answer those questions.

If you’re not yet up to date on COVID vaccines, visit vaccines.gov to make your appointment today. To order more at-home COVID tests, visit CovidTests.gov.

By the numbers:

This graphic is updated as of 8:20 a.m. on July 11. For the latest stats, click the image, which sends you to the Johns Hopkins site.

AROUND OMAHA

  • A group of officials is teaming to open a resource center for the Westside, Ralston, and Millard school districts. The center will pair at-risk youths and their families with community-based services. Additional offices are planned for North and South Omaha.
  • Green space is lacking in North and South Omaha, prompting researchers at UNMC to examine how the neighborhoods are becoming urban “heat islands.” Omaha is one of 14 cities participating in the heat mapping study this summer.
  • Amazon Prime Day returns Tuesday, July 12, but some metro-area small businesses are urging customers to keep their dollars local.
  • A mixed-use development is moving forward along the 30th Street corridor. The project would replace the Spencer Homes public housing complex, built in the 1950s. Developers plan on building single-family homes, duplexes, townhomes, a multi-story apartment building and retail space.

AROUND NEBRASKA

  • By the end of the Nebraska Republican Party Convention, the party loses its chairman, executive director, two of three district chairs, national committee woman, three assistant state chairs, secretary, treasurer and lawyer, among others.
  • The Nebraska Supreme Court rejects an appeal from convicted murderer Joshua Keadle. Keadle was convicted of second-degree murder in the case of Tyler Thomas, a 19-year-old student at Peru State College who went missing in December 2010. Keadle was sentenced to 71 years in prison.
  • Lincoln railroad workers are protesting BNSF, advocating for railroad companies to work with unions on a contract. The workers have gone without a contract since 2019.
  • Five health insurance companies have submitted bids to handle the state’s Medicaid managed-care program. State lawmakers say they hope the state chooses a contract based on which company provides the best service, not based on which costs the least.

REED MOORE ON LOCAL GOVERNMENT

This week:

  • County Budget Hearing: The Douglas County Board of Commissioners will hold a public hearing Tuesday, July 12, on the proposed 2022-23 budget. The budget totals over $500 million, which includes $55.5 million from the American Rescue Plan Act. The $242 million General Fund is 5.2% higher than the previous year due to increased expenses for the criminal justice system and increased payroll for county employees. 
  • ARPA: The County Board will also vote on $500,000 in ARPA funding for the Omaha Economic Development Corporation to construct a kitchen at CHI Health. The Omaha City Council recently approved tax increment financing for the project.
  • No City Council: The Omaha City Council won’t meet this week. The next scheduled meeting is July 19.

Every week, Anton Johnson picks noteworthy agenda items from the Omaha City Council and Douglas County Board of Commissioners. See the Board of Commissioners agenda for Tuesday, July 12, and tune in here to the Douglas County Board at 9 a.m.


FACT OF THE DAY

From Harper’s Index

Percentage by which men are more likely than women
to want their lives documented by a biographer: 23

Source: YouGov (NYC)


DAILY FUNNY

Comic by Koterba. Support him on Patreon.

MOORE FUNNIES >>


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Subscribe to The Reader Newsletter

Our awesome email newsletter briefing tells you everything you need to know about what’s going on in Omaha. Delivered to your inbox every day at 11:00am.

Become a Supporting Member

Subscribe to thereader.com and become a supporting member to keep locally owned news alive. We need to pay writers, so you can read even more. We won’t waste your time, our news will focus, as it always has, on the stories other media miss and a cultural community — from arts to foods to local independent business — that defines us. Please support your locally-owned news media by becoming a member today.

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