SF artist in Omaha with Kent Bellows Studio…

Lincoln photographer features Iraqi women...Fred Simon Gallery taking applications...Florence Mill ArtLoft Blessings in Field...


San Francisco-based Urban Artist Char Boogie is visiting Omaha via Kent Bellows Studio and Impact One Community Connection. The self-taught aerosol artist will give youth workshops, complete a mural in North Omaha, host a Community Conversation and make an appearance at the Maha Music Festival August 11. The “Urban Art in the Community” Dialogue will take place August 8, 7pm, at Love’s Jazz and Arts Center to discuss illegal graffiti in community, types of urban art, motivation behind graffiti, youth language and social change. Kentbellows.org.

Lincoln based photographer Wesaam Al-Badry examines the courage of Iraqi women who escaped war and started a new life with his exhibit “The Iraqi Project” in at 301 N. 8th St. Lincoln by appointment thru August. Al-Badry, who came to Lincoln from Iraq with his mother and siblings in 1994, photographed refugee women to tell their stories and capture their strength. Powbangpow.blogspot.com.

Fred Simon Gallery is accepting applications for the 2013/14 Exhibition Season. The Gallery showcases the work of approximately six contemporary Nebraska artists throughout the year, providing the downtown gallery space at no cost, hosting receptions, does marketing efforts and takes no commissions. Applications due August 31.  nebraskaartscouncil.org.

Curbside Clothing owner Adam Hogan is exhibiting his recycled silk screens, acrylic paint and original silk-screened imagery inspired by travel, music, art and culture thru August at the Old Market shop. Curbsideclothing.com.

Florence Mill ArtLoft is hosting the first exhibit of “Landmarks in a Sea of Grass” to be displayed inside a mill. The photographs by Bruce Selyem with text by Barbara Krupp Selyem represent some of 80,000 photos from 5,200 locations throughout US and Canada. The Montana residents explore grain elevator landscapes finding a “disappearing act;” Old wood country grain elevators as monumental structures on the prairie landscape since the mid 19th century. As they are replaced with modern facilities, they become nostalgic icons of a vanishing way of life. Outside the Mill, in partnership with Nebraska Women’s Caucus for Art, “Blessings in the Field” are beginning to cover the field. Artists created 5×8” fabric flags in various colors, styles and meaning. The concept is similar whether they are Tibetan, Buddhist, Native American, or NE Women’s Caucus for the Arts prayer flags, according to Meigs: “transferring our hopes, dreams, prayers and supplications onto a piece of fabric and letting the breeze blow them wherever those intentions go.” They welcome members of the community to add their own flags over the next few weeks, up until October.  The Florence Mill (and ArtLoft) is located at 9102 North 30th St. historicflorence.org/FlorenceMill.

Visit thereader.com for my review of Heidi Bartlett at Peerless, Mike Krainak’s review of The Moving Gallery’s exhibit and more.


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