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Morgan Fields, “Exaltation,” 2021, barbed wire and nylon fabric, 7.5’ x 5’ x 5’

Using her art to dig deep into life’s thornier realities, multimedia artist Morgan Fields presents a new installation of sculpture and prints at Petshop, with a First Friday opening on Nov. 4 from 7-10pm and continuing through Dec. 30.

“Barbed Labyrinth” is just that—Fields will create a disorienting, cavelike experience from spires of woven barbed wire and fabric. Evoking the five stages of grief, the labyrinth communicates both suffering and resilience, frequent themes in her work.

The show also includes “Life in Purgatory,” an ongoing series of photopolymer intaglio prints. With their Rorschachian blots of pooled organic material, Fields intends them to create an abstracted space to connect with the void in preparation for glory.

“Morgan Fields: Barbed Labyrinth” will show at the Petshop in Benson from Nov. 4 to Dec. 30, with an opening on First Friday from 7-10pm. The gallery is located at 2725 N. 62nd Street. To visit after the opening reception, please check the gallery’s Facebook page or email alex@bff.org for more information.


Subscribe to The Reader Newsletter

Our awesome email newsletter briefing tells you everything you need to know about what’s going on in Omaha. Delivered to your inbox every day at 11:00am.

Become a Supporting Member

Subscribe to thereader.com and become a supporting member to keep locally owned news alive. We need to pay writers, so you can read even more. We won’t waste your time, our news will focus, as it always has, on the stories other media miss and a cultural community — from arts to foods to local independent business — that defines us. Please support your locally-owned news media by becoming a member today.

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